Tag: rotator cuff

Breastfeeding and the Shoulder

I put out a call on my Facebook page (link) asking for questions about shoulder related issues and I got a lot of really great questions. I can only answer these questions with the limited knowledge and training that I have and thus these are by no means definitive answers, but they might help to guide your thinking. If I can point you in the direction for more information, I certainly will. I answered the first question in my last post (link) as it was about that topic (scapular movement)

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Scapulae: How Wide is Wide Enough?

Last post (link) I spoke of the relationship between the scapula (shoulder blade) and the humerus (arm bone) and that it would be nice if they had a supportive relationship so that the arm could have full range of motion without damage to the tissues (muscles/tendons/nerves/blood vessels) of the shoulder. This time we’ll go over what the full range of motion is and how we get it. This is where things get interesting. Most anatomists talk about muscles and the bones they attach to, and th

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Is Your Rotator Cuff in an Abusive Relationship?

If I said “point to your shoulder” you’d probably point to the top of your arm and you’d be correct, that is what is typically thought of as the shoulder joint. Technically this is called the Glenohumeral joint. The bone of the upper arm is the Humerus, the socket it sits in is the Glenoid Fossa, hence Gleno-Humeral. But what makes up the socket? I remember first learning about the shoulder and not really having a clear idea of what constituted the entire joint. If you think of a Barb

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Hanging for Shoulder Health

Shoulders are particularly poor in health in our culture. We use arms and hands and shoulders a fraction of their potential. Arms are usually internally rotated as the default norm, which means the humeral head is rolled forward and in in the glenoid fossa of the scapula. [caption id="attachment_1066" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Typical forward head of a "gamer" showing rolled forward shoulders.[/caption] The scapula (shoulder blade) sits on the rib cage, so the position of the rib ca

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Notes on Shoulder Health

This post is in response to a reader request for more details on the RE™ approach to shoulder health. In order to have this discussion, it is necessary to talk first about shoulder anatomy. Shoulders and feet are pretty much my favourite topics anatomically. They both have a lot in common: they are complex structures that are both fundamentally underused and overused! We can stand on our feet all day, or run a marathon (overuse) but we can't spread our toes or lift them individually (under

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